Comparison Amazon Photos vs Google Photos

Google Photos is discontinuing its free storage option But after years of conditioning users to unlimited free space for their images, it’s understandable that people are starting to look for alternatives that don’t charge as much as Google Photos in the future.

One of the most interesting competitors could be Amazon Photos, which is incredibly similar to Google Photos.. However, there is a big catch: Amazon Photos does not have a 100% free tier. You must pay Amazon Prime to enjoy the benefits.

PROS

features Almost all the features you would expect from Google Photos are there, in one form or another.
Filters Amazon Photos allows you to filter and sort your images more easily than Google.
Fire TV / Alexa integration Naturally, Amazon Photos works well with Alexa and Fire TV.
Desktop client The Amazon desktop client allows you to view your gallery.
Edition Solid selection of tools.
Family vault You can share your unlimited storage plan with up to five people.

CONS

Amazon Prime Exclusive The service is only good value if you already subscribe to Amazon Prime or have friends and family to share the cost with.
Videos have an additional cost Only 5GB of uploaded videos are free for Prime members.
No native Chromecast support You will have to rely on casting your phone’s full screen to display images.
Look for Amazon’s image recognition just isn’t up to scratch.
Desktop client, again It redirects you to the Amazon website if you want to edit or view photos in full screen.
Editing, again There is no automatic correction option and you must save your edits to a new file.
Collaboration You are not allowed to share photos or albums only with specific people, outside of Family Vault.

Prices

The Amazon Image Service is part of Prime, which costs 3.99 a month or 36 a year. If you’re already paying for it to access Prime’s other benefits like free shipping and Prime Video, moving all of your images might be a no-brainer.

But if the main reason to get Prime is access to unlimited media storage, it may not be a better investment than sticking with Google Photos. With the Google service, you can store up to 15 GB of images newly uploaded for free into the service in the future, with a 100GB option available for just € 2 / month (€ 20 / year).

Even the 2TB option is still cheaper than Amazon Prime at € 10 / month (€ 100 / year), which should last most people many years, if not forever, if you are selective about what you put on the shelf. cloud.

With Amazon Photos, is also looking for just 5GB of free video storage; You should budget at least € 2 more per month if you want to save a lot of videos. If you don’t have Amazon Prime, you can still save up to 5GB of full resolution photos and videos, but after that, you need to pay. There is no direct slope to the old free tier of Google Photos with unlimited compressed images.

However, when thinking about the price, you should keep in mind that Amazon allows you to share your unlimited photo storage with up to five friends or family thanks to the so-called Family Vault. Members can share images with each other in an additional section of the app, but each person also gets their own private Photos account, and unless they explicitly decide to share images with their Family Vault, things will remain private for everyone. If enough trusted friends sign up (or if you have a large family) and everyone is willing to share some of the price, Prime could end up being significantly cheaper than Google Photos in the long run.

library

Amazon Photos should look and feel familiar when you switch from Google Photos. The app is divided into four bottom tabs, giving you instant access to a timeline of all your photos and videos, an additional section to share your images with your Family Vault, a shortcut to your albums, and a More tab with access to settings, backup status and hidden files.

That’s basically it: much cleaner than Google Photos with your shortcut to the store, your stories, and all the red banners that ask you to visit other sections of the app. The Amazon search bar is also instantly accessible on your timeline and is not hidden in an additional tab, as is the case with Google Photos.

Unlike Google, Amazon also allows you to filter and sort images in your gallery by type (photo or video), people, places, things (such as plants, trees, roads, etc.) and date taken. You can recreate some of these filters by searching Google Photos, but having them instantly accessible is a win. Amazon Photos will also ask you to confirm where you want the images to be deleted each time you hit the trash can icon.

When it comes to sharing albums and pictures, Amazon mainly offers what Google offers you. You can use the share button to generate a link and share a full resolution image without sending it as a file, or multiple images in an album. Just keep in mind that anyone with the link will be able to see what you have shared, so others could redistribute their collection of Rick Astley images without your permission (this is also an issue on Google Photos, if they share images as a link) .

Amazon’s image recognition doesn’t seem to be on par with Google’s. You can search for generic terms that describe your images to find what you’re looking for, and Amazon will do its best to give you relevant results. But while Google is able to tell that my hamster is obviously not a cat, Amazon believes that it is a cat in virtually every image I have uploaded of it. Amazon even claims it is a dog in a picture.

However, she does not seem to have a problem recognizing men. By naming the faces that Amazon Photos recognizes, you can also easily find the people you’ve photographed by name. Google continues to appear as the best service here, with faces more correctly identified. Still, Amazon search is mostly functional for broader terms, although false positives sometimes make it difficult to navigate through the results.

Like Google Photos, Amazon Photos allows you to view your images in your web browser, just go to amazon.es. The web view primarily gives you access to the same images and editing tools as the phone app. Filters, Albums, People, and Family Vault are easily accessible in a sidebar. You can also switch between different gallery display options.

Also available are an iOS app and an autoloading tool complete with a gallery view for your desktop; it’s a shame that the latter forwards you to the Amazon website every time you want to edit or view an image in full screen.

Edition

The editing tools in Amazon Photo are comparable to what you get in Google Photos. Nail the basics like cropping and horizon correction, as well as image adjustments like brightness, contrast, and saturation. You can also change the focus, use a brush, and comment on the image with text and stickers. However, the filter selection is a bit smaller than what you get in Google Photos, and more importantly, there is no automatic correction option; you must do everything manually if you are not satisfied with the result of a photo.

Amazon Photos also doesn’t allow you to override an original file with edits; you must save the changes to a new file, and it will coexist with the unedited one if you don’t delete it. Google Photos allows you to save your settings in the same file, but it keeps the original version of the image and lets you go back to it if you want, a more elegant solution, if you ask me.

Third party integrations

Since Amazon competes directly with Google when it comes to voice assistants, TV devices, and streaming protocols, you won’t see native Chromecast support in the Amazon Photos app. Instead, you will have to cast your full screen to your Chromecast to display images on the big screen or on a smart screen. That’s a viable solution, although it’s not as convenient as using Photos’s built-in capabilities.

If you stop uploading files to Google Photos, you won’t see your most recent pictures on your Nest Hub and other Google devices with displays either, naturally.

Amazon Photos also doesn’t allow you to override an original file with edits; you must save the changes to a new file, and it will coexist with the unedited one if you don’t delete it. Google Photos allows you to save your settings in the same file, but it keeps the original version of the image and lets you go back to it if you want, a more elegant solution, if you ask me.

Third party integrations

Since Amazon competes directly with Google when it comes to voice assistants, TV devices, and streaming protocols, you won’t see native Chromecast support in the Amazon Photos app. Instead, you will have to cast your full screen to your Chromecast to display images on the big screen or on a smart screen. That’s a viable solution, although it’s not as convenient as using Photos’s built-in capabilities.

If you stop uploading files to Google Photos, you won’t see your most recent pictures on your Nest Hub and other Google devices with displays either, naturally.

Overall, Amazon Photos is a competitive alternative to Google Photos. And if you share it with enough friends who are willing to contribute to your Prime membership, you could even end up saving some money compared to what Google Photos could cost you in the future. Still, committing to signing up for the service with other people could end friendships, especially if you need or want to kick someone out of the group. You also have to pay extra money if you need more than 5GB of video storage.

Also, you should keep in mind that you will lose some Google Photos features such as shared private albums, auto edit tools and creations, and tight integration with Google Cast and Nest devices. However, the latter might not be a problem at all if you’re an Amazon Alexa home.

Download QR-CodeAmazon Photos Developer: Amazon Mobile LLC Price: Free

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